Ross University Blog

RUSM Announces New Clinical Agreement with Western Connecticut Health Network

September 08, 2015

Ross University School of Medicine (RUSM) is pleased to announce a new clinical affiliation agreement with Western Connecticut Health Network (WCHN), giving RUSM students even more options for clinical training and core or elective rotations. This agreement places students at either Danbury Hospital or Norwalk Hospital, both operated by WHCN, and effectively adds 24 more slots for core rotations, as well as additional slots for fourth-year electives and 24 slots in a WCHM-run, fourth-year global health elective.

“As our students know, we place strong emphasis on our students’ clinical educations, starting with their very first semester here at RUSM,” said Joseph A. Flaherty, MD, dean and chancellor. “This new agreement gives even more students the opportunity to complete core rotations in learning environments in the Connecticut area.”

Clinical Rotations at Danbury Hospital

Danbury Hospital is a 371-bed, regional medical center and university teaching hospital associated with Yale University School of Medicine, the University of Connecticut School of Medicine, and the University of Vermont College of Medicine. This year, U.S. News and World Report ranked Danbury among the top three hospitals in Connecticut, and the facility is one of seven that exceeded expected standards of care in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), heart failure, and knee replacement.

Clinical Rotations at Norwalk Hospital

Norwalk Hospital, a teaching facility for Yale School of Medicine, is a 328-bed acute care community teaching hospital that serves a population of roughly 250,000 in lower Fairfield County, Connecticut. Signature clinical programs include cancer, cardiovascular, digestive diseases, emergency care, orthopedics/neurospine, and women’s/children’s services. In 2010, 2011, and 2012, the hospital earned the Healthgrades® Distinguished Hospital Award for Clinical Excellence, and was listed as one of America’s best hospitals for stroke care by Healthgrades in late 2012.

Optional Global Health Elective

Both hospitals offer RUSM students the opportunity to travel to established clinical sites abroad via a fourth-year global health elective operated by WCHN schools. These rotations, which last for up to six weeks, allow students to globally enrich their clinical education by engaging in cultural and educational exchanges that characterize the concept of global health. Sites abroad in the past have included Uganda, Vietnam, China, and Russia.

In addition to WCHN hospitals, clinical students can also complete elective rotations in Connecticut at St. Mary’s Hospital, Waterbury. Learn more about RUSM’s clinical affiliates here.

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