Ross University Blog

What RUSM Students Learned at the U of Miami/Florida Bioethics Network Annual Meeting

April 18, 2016

Avery Carter, back row, left, Dr. Mucciola, Prathayini Muthiah, Nicholas Alexander, Kenneth Goodman, PhD, director of the Florida Bioethics Network and director of the UM Institute for Bioethics and Health Policy, Abigail House. In the front row: Ryan Shibata, left, Christen Kelley, Ellexis Khan, and Shannon Dorton.

Avery Carter, back row, left, Dr. Mucciola, Prathayini Muthiah, Nicholas Alexander, Kenneth Goodman, PhD, director of the Florida Bioethics Network and director of the UM Institute for Bioethics and Health Policy, Abigail House. In the front row: Ryan Shibata, left, Christen Kelley, Ellexis Khan, and Shannon Dorton.

For the ninth year in a row, Ross University School of Medicine (RUSM) co-sponsored the University of Miami/Florida Bioethics Network annual meeting. This year’s event, “Florida Bioethics: Debates, Decisions, Solutions” was held in Miami on April 8.

“This is a chance to meet with, and engage in a dialogue with experts in the field, practicing MDs and medical students from other universities,” said RUSM’s Robert N. Mucciola, MD, MA (Bioethics), FACOG Professor and Chairman, Obstetrics and Gynecology. “The general objectives center on the appreciation and assessment of the role and importance of bioethics in clinical and institutional decision making.”

Dr. Mucciola has spearheaded RUSM's involvement with this important conference from the beginning, and has organized the attendance of a number of our students, with registration fees waived. Students traveled from as far away as California, Chicago, New York and Maryland to attend.

“No matter what field of medicine you go into, the topics discussed apply to you, ” said student Nicholas Alexander.

Instilling a Culture of Caring

Student participants came away from the conference with a renewed appreciation for the physician's role in ensuring patients' needs and desires are met. “This meeting gave insight on how to follow medical ethics within the guidelines of legislation," said California native Ryan Shibata. "Although the laws may be slightly ambiguous, it’s our job as physicians to make sure that our patients’ wishes are not.”

"The most important thing I learned at this meeting was to have compassion toward patients and make their wishes your priority," said Ellexis Khan, a third-year student, "especially when it comes to end-of-life care."

Third-year student Avery Carter echoed their sentiments. “We must be wary not to become so consumed in 'medicine' that we lose sight of the reason for our work, and that, simply, is to care for the patient," said Carter. "In all areas, we must care.”  

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