Ross University Blog

Ross Duo Voted Co-Chief Residents at Michigan State University Emergency Medicine Residency Program

July 24, 2017

Ross alumni Sarah Wolf, MD, and Aaron Tyagi, MD, recently were elected 2017-2018 Co-Chief Residents in Emergency Medicine at Michigan State University (MSU) and Sparrow Hospital in Lansing, Mich.

According to Drs. Wolf and Tyagi, neither of them set out with a deliberate strategy to obtain a chief resident position. They simply wanted to maintain a standard that is worthy of the medical profession.

“Chief Resident is not something I think either of us truly considered or predicted when we started our residency,” says Dr. Tyagi.

“My intention for every shift is purely to show up with the expectation that my colleagues and I are going to provide the best care for each patient,” says Dr. Wolf.

For Dr. Wolf, the commitment to patient care is very personal. During her first year of residency, Dr. Wolf was a full-time caregiver for her mother who was battling stage four cancer.

“Throughout that difficult time, I realized the importance of the doctor-patient-family relationship,” says Dr. Wolf. “Medicine is about far more than just scientific knowledge.”

“From the first day, I wanted to take an active role not only in my resident education but in doing what I could to make residency better for all,” adds Dr. Tyagi when asked to pinpoint reasons why he was elected to the position.”

Dr. Tyagi’s contributions to the residency program include expanding the intern curriculum during his first year and, along with another colleague, beginning a low fidelity simulation program operated by residents. In addition, Dr. Tyagi is a representative of the Emergency Medicine Residents’ Association and is Chair for the Social Media Committee of the American Academy of Emergency Medicine’s Resident and Student Association.

The Emergency Medicine residency program at MSU has a two-tiered process to electing chief residents. First, leadership nominates qualified residents who have proven themselves as effective leaders throughout their residency. Once nominated, peer residents vote for the nominee(s) they believe possess the qualities to best represent the collective.

“Being Chief Resident is a great honor but also comes with a fair amount of responsibility that you really cannot appreciate until you are actively in the role,” says Dr. Tyagi.

“I’m excited to utilize this upcoming year to cultivate my leadership skills,” says Dr. Wolf.
 

You May Also Like ...

Tags: Residency , Emergency Medicine , Michigan

Add comment

COMMENTS

No comments yet. Be the first!

Subscribe

 

RUSM Blog

News and perspectives from our campus, colleagues, and alumni

P R E V I O U S  P O S T S

A R C H I V E

B L O G S  B Y  T A G

, "Community Service", "Internal Medicine", Academics, Admissions, Advice, Alaska, Alumni, Anesthesiology, Arizona, Blog, Brazil, California, Campus, Canada, Cancer, Cardiology, Career-Changer, CaRMS, Chief Resident, Chief resident, Clinical Program, Clinical Science, Clinical Sciences, Community Service, Connecticut, Couples, Dean, Diabetes, Diversity, Dominica, Donation, Emergency, Emergency Medicine, Endocrinology, Expert, Faculty, Family, Family Medicine, Fellowship, Flaherty, Florida, Georgia, Graduates, Graduation, Illinois, Innovation, Internal Medicine, Kentucky, Leadership, Louisana, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Match, MCAT, MERP, Miami, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, News, Nigeria, Nonprofit, North Carolina, Nurse, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pediatrics, Pennsylvania, Psychiatry, Public Health, Radiology, Relay for Life, Research, Residency, Ross Experience, Scholarships, simulation, Social Mission, South Dakota, Student Services, Students, Surgery, Tennessee, Texas, USMLE, Weather, White Coat, Women in Medicine