Ross University Blog

Chief Resident: Dr. Lee Talks about Her Start in Emergency Medicine

March 30, 2016

Ginny Lee, MD, Class of 2013, is a Chief Resident in the Department of Emergency Medicine at Summa Akron City Hospital in Akron, Ohio.


RUSM: What attracted you to RUSM?

LEE: I appreciated the flexibility of its start dates, the Caribbean location, and having a different experience than I would have had in the United States.

RUSM: How did you prepare for the NRMP® Match?

LEE: I took several personality quizzes, interviewed at as many places as possible, and rotated at those I was very interested in.

RUSM: How did RUSM help prepare you for your residency position?

LEE: RUSM molded my study habits, taught me efficiency, and prepared me to be ready for anything.

RUSM: What are the key factors that led to you achieving a chief resident position?

LEE: I wanted to find a way I could serve the residency that gave me such a wonderful opportunity. In return, the chief resident position has taught me leadership skills. 

RUSM: What additional responsibilities have you assumed since becoming a chief resident?

LEE: I became the education chief and have enjoyed creating the academic schedule for the residency, including weekly conferences. This allowed me to interact and communicate with, as well as learn from, many great speakers and educators.

RUSM: What’s next for you?

LEE: I will be working with an Emergency Medicine group in Ohio, taking many vacations and conferences. Also, I will get married in the next year to an amazing man I met at Ross [University School of Medicine]!

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Tags: Chief resident , Alumni , Ohio

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CARMS: Canadian Student Gets 1 of 2 Available IMG Peds Spots at Western U

March 30, 2016

Kristen Bortolin, RUSM Class of 2016

Kristen Bortolin, RUSM Class of 2016

Newly matched student Kristen Bortolin (Class of 2016) always knew she wanted to work with kids. Before medical school, she volunteered at The Hospital for Sick Children, a children’s hospital in Toronto—a four-year volunteering stint that opened her eyes to what it would be like as a pediatrician. “[It] galvanized my desire to work with children,” she says.

Her final core rotation as a Ross University School of Medicine (RUSM) clinical student—pediatrics at Mount Sinai Hospital in Chicago—cemented it.

“Though I thoroughly enjoyed all of my core rotations, it was obvious that my true passion was in pediatrics,” says Bortolin, who matched in pediatrics at Western University in London, Ontario, through the 2016 Canadian Resident Matching Service (CaRMS) this year. “I enjoy the complex relationship I will get to have with both a parent and a child—pediatricians play a large role in empowering children to make healthy decisions, which will contribute to their adult health.”

“I Still Can’t Believe I Matched in Canada”

Going into the CaRMS Match, Bortolin knew it would be an uphill battle to claim a residency in her home country. There were only 13 pediatric residency spots available in the entire province of Ontario for international medical graduates (IMGs), and just two available pediatrics spots at Western for IMGs.

“I still can’t believe I matched in Canada,” she says. “I am so honored to have been chosen to train at [Western].”

Western University, she says, was her top choice for residency.

Equipping Students with the Tools for Success

Bortolin says that RUSM provides students with tools to help them succeed in medicine, starting with RUSM’s “strong” Foundations of Medicine (basic sciences) curriculum in Dominica. For clinical rotations, she completed all of her cores at Mount Sinai. “We have great hospital affiliations,” she says.

Moreover, Canadian RUSM students often have the option to complete some of their elective rotations in Canada—a benefit that proved useful to Bortolin during residency preparations.

“This opportunity allows us to identify qualities that Canadian residency programs value so we can work hard to become desirable candidates,” she says.

Bortolin starts residency training in July. Looking ahead, she says she’d like to practice general pediatrics in both hospital and clinic settings—with an eye on fellowship options in the future.

Other Articles About RUSM Grads and the 2016 Match

Tags: Residency

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MATCH: 3 Questions with a RUSM Grad Who Just Earned His Top-Choice Residency

March 28, 2016

Ross University School of Medicine (RUSM) alumnus Nathan Collins, who graduated in November 2015, has obtained a residency in internal medicine at Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital. It was his first choice. Dr. Collins, a graduate of Arizona State University and southern Califoria native, recently took a few minutes to answer questions about his RUSM experience.

Q: Why did you choose Ross University School of Medicine?

A: Once I realized that attending a US medical school was not a likely option, I began looking at Caribbean medical schools for an opportunity to realize my dream of becoming a physician. I chose Ross so that I could attend a proven foreign medical school that had full accreditation in all 50 states allowing me to work wherever I wanted once I graduated. In addition, I wanted to be able to receive federal funding to pay for my education.

Q: What area of medicine are you most interested in? Why?

A: Internal medicine. I enjoy the diverse pathology and puzzles internists face each day, the subspecialty options available, and the ability to develop rapport with patients as you manage their illnesses.

Q: How would you describe your experiences in Dominica?

A: It was adventurous. I rented a motorized scooter all four semesters and would go on trips around the island on my study breaks, including Roseau, Morne Diablotins, and various beaches. In addition I played in intramural sports while on the island, including soccer, ultimate frisbee, volleyball, and flag football.

Other Articles About RUSM Grads and the 2016 Match

Tags: Residency

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Q&A: What Can the Student Affairs Department Do for You?

March 23, 2016

Paula Wales and Bryan Hayse
Paula Wales, EdD (above, left), senior associate dean of academic and student affairs, and Bryan Hayse, associate dean of student affairs

If there’s one thing that students at Ross University School of Medicine (RUSM) need to know it’s this: if you’re having any kind of trouble, personal or academic, the Student Affairs department is here to help. Paula Wales, EdD, senior associate dean of academic and student affairs recently sat down with Bryan Hayse, EdD, associate dean of student affairs, Dominica campus, to talk about the types of issues students may face and how they can get help. Here is an excerpt from that conversation:

Hayse: Every semester I have a person who seeks us out a little too late, and says, ‘I didn’t know there was anything that could be done.’ Don’t wait until a problem escalates – early intervention is key. 

Wales: As soon as anything goes wrong, come talk to us and we’ll try to help you. Do not lose the opportunity for early intervention. If you don’t know the answer, come to us and we’ll find out. Can I take a leave? When do I have to apply to take the USMLE® Step 1? Bring us any kind of problem or concern before it gets out of hand.

Hayes: We can assist you with housing concerns, immigration issues, student insurance, financial aid, just to name a few areas.. When there’s a tragedy, for example a death in the family, and the student is not handling it well, we may refer him or her to our counseling center.

Wales: If the student is struggling academically, and maybe failed the first mini exam, and is not sure of the options available, we can help identify where to start. We can also talk to the faculty on their behalf about coursework and grades. Sometimes medical students think they’re too busy to get help. All they need to do is take a moment and contact Student Affairs. They will be directed to the right person.

Hayes: We’re not going to solve all your problems but we have a wide range of resources for you, like the Center for Teaching and Learning, a specific faculty member,  the Health Center, and if needed, accommodations for disabilities.

Wales: It’s hard for medical students to seek help. They’ve done well and people look up to them. But then the first time grandma gets sick or they fail an exam it hits them really hard. Sometimes they dig in and think they can handle it on their own. Remember, there are very few things we haven’t seen. We might be able to get you a leave of absence. We can help you solve problems.

Hayes: Students need to understand that everyone struggles at some point along the way. It’s ok to reach out. Remember, the longer you go before getting help, the fewer options remain.

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Tags: Students , Academics

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MATCH: RUSM Was the 'Experience of a Lifetime', Says Newly Matched Grad

March 21, 2016

Hailey Shah, a Ross University School of Medicine (RUSM) 2016 graduate, said that attending the school, “was the best experience. It was the experience of a lifetime.” She has obtained a residency in internal medicine at Mount Sinai Beth Israel, Manhattan, NY. She hopes to pursue a fellowship in pulmonary and critical care medicine.

The Texas native earned her undergraduate degree at the University of Houston, with a major in biology and minor in chemistry, “with the sole purpose of pursuing medical school,” she said.  Shah said that her first round of applications to US medical schools “was very disappointing.” However, she added, “I had such a passion for medicine that I had to try again. It was a blessing in disguise. I knew RUSM would give me a chance to redeem myself. I did my research and felt confident that I’d get the education I needed. I knew I had the aptitude and the will to succeed.”

That positive attitude and strong determination have contributed to Shah’s success. She said that she enjoyed her time on the Dominica campus, achieving “a good balance of working hard and playing hard.” She and her friends made it a point to do a fun activity after each exam, several times a semester. “You have to take time to give your brain a break,” she said. Shah also made time to volunteer with the Salybia Mission Project, a student group that brings health care to Dominica’s indigenous people.

Members of her family, including her new husband, her parents and in-laws, will be at the RUSM commencement ceremony in Coral Gables in May, to proudly watch the first doctor in the family walk across the stage in her cap and gown to receive her MD degree.

Tags: Residency

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2016 PRE-MATCH: Student Grabs First-Choice Internal Medicine Residency

March 18, 2016

Evan Sternberg, graduating with an MD degree from Ross University School of Medicine (RUSM) in May, has pre-matched at Mount Sinai Hospital in Chicago in Internal Medicine. He is currently completing his electives there.

A native of Ohio, Sternberg, 26, earned his undergraduate degree at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. He said he chose to enroll at RUSM, “because they saw the same potential in me that I saw in myself.”

While on the Dominica campus he was involved in the Salybia Mission Project, a student group that volunteers to bring healthcare services to the indigenous Kalinago people living in the Carib territory. He was also a member of AMSA. Sternberg said he greatly enjoyed his time on the island, and made lifelong friends there.

Mount Sinai in Chicago was his first choice for a residency, he said, adding, “The attendings are so dedicated to teaching, and the entire Internal Medicine residency program is dedicated to helping graduates become the best doctors they can be.”

Check back here soon for more Match coverage!

Tags: Residency

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MATCH: RUSM Grads Attain Residencies in 2016 NRMP Match

March 18, 2016

Looking for the 2016 residency list? View it here.

Congratulations to all of the Ross University School of Medicine graduates who earned residencies through the National Resident Matching Program® (NRMP) Main Residency Match this year. Our graduates matched in a variety of disciplines at teaching hospitals and centers throughout the United States.

“Our graduates earned this success,” said Joseph A. Flaherty, MD, dean and chancellor of RUSM. “They worked hard, they didn’t give up, and they embodied the qualities that make RUSM-trained physicians so special—passion, intelligence, and tenacity. I expect nothing but great things as they embark on their careers as physicians.”

Residency, though still considered a training period, marks a medical school graduate’s first real step into the physician workforce. Under supervision from attending physicians, new residents spend most of their time training in their matched teaching hospitals, gaining in-depth, hands-on working knowledge of their chosen medical discipline.

Last year in 2015, more residency spots—30,000+—were available through the NRMP than ever before, and more than 34,000 total applicants vied for those spots, according to the NRMP. The NRMP predicts this year’s match would be even larger than that, per its website.

The NRMP notified all candidates this past Monday, 3/14, whether or not they’d actually matched. For those who did, this week has been a waiting game—until today—to find out where, and in which programs.

Matched RUSM grads will begin residency training in July 2015. Now, though, it’s a time to celebrate. Tomorrow, Saturday, March 19, newly minted residents from RUSM will join family, friends, and fellow new residents in New York, Chicago, and Miami to come together and reflect on what they’ve accomplished.

Check out the 2016 residency list here.

Tags: Residency

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MATCH: Determination Pays Off. Grad Gets Top Choice in 2016 Match.

March 18, 2016

Looking for the 2016 residency list? View it here.

As far back as middle school, Jason Patton, 28, knew that he wanted to be a physician. Now, the Ross University School of Medicine (RUSM) alumnus, who graduated in November 2015, has obtained a residency in family medicine at University of Arkansas Medical School – Fort Smith, his first choice for a match.

“I like that family medicine allows you to see any patient for any reason,” said the Texas native. “The spectrum of what you can do in family medicine is so wide and so deep.”

Patton earned his undergraduate degree at the University of Texas at Arlington, majoring in biology. He said he chose to enroll in RUSM, “because I wanted a school with a longstanding reputation of excellence.” He also liked the environment of the Dominica campus, where he completed the Foundations of Medicine curriculum. “I needed a place to study that was away from the hustle and bustle of the city. I spent most of my time studying. I was pretty much determined to put my head into the books.” Still, Patton made time to volunteer with the Ross Homeless Outreach Program, a student-led organization that raises funds for the homeless in Dominica. Members of the group also go to the homeless shelters around Dominica to provide basic medical care.

His determination and focus paid off; Patton graduated from RUSM with a high GPA, and earned high scores on his USMLE® Step I and Step 2 exams. His applications for the Residency Match resulted in 53 offers of interviews, of which he accepted 24. “I went into this very cautiously,” he said, explaining why he applied to a large number of residency programs. During the time he was doing his clinical rotations, Patton had gotten married, and he said his wife was a great help to him in organizing the interviews for the Match. “Within the first week of the Match opening, I had 10 or 15 offers for interviews, seven or eight in one day,” he related. “After the first 20, I got picky.”

Reflecting on his journey so far and on his future career as a physician, Patton was confident about the decisions he has made. “I look at myself years from now, when I’m 50, and family medicine fits all the bills perfectly,” he said.

Tags: Residency

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VIEWPOINT: Can Those Who Practice Medicine Also Teach Medicine?

March 17, 2016

This article was written by Robert Dean, MD, RUSM OB/GYN Clerkship Director.

Are practicing medicine and teaching medicine pretty much the same thing? Maybe, maybe not. I always liked teaching.  Even as a resident I would take students and teach them.  Everybody said I was good at it.  As an attending, in private practice, I would give lectures and agreed to supervise residents. I even won a couple of awards from the staff.  So it was not much of a surprise when a local community hospital hired me to run their Family Medicine OB/GYN service.

Resident lectures, supervising clinics and deliveries -- it was fun and productive.  I felt I really knew my stuff and was doing a great job.  A few years later, my chairman came to me and told me we were getting OB/GYN residents and medical students from a nearby osteopathic school.  He told me that since I was already teaching the family medicine residents that I should create a curriculum for the residents’ and students’ rotation.  Well, after a few hours of seminars at the school, I wrote what I thought was a reasonable orientation and lecture schedule. Things went along pretty well.

How I felt about education was that clinical work is a great way to learn.  Work hard and you will learn and get a great grade.  I had no direct knowledge of exams, shelf, step, whatever. The students went back to their school for those things and I was not involved.  Evaluations?  I was never informed about how they could be best worded for the residency application.  Letters of recommendation?  Ha, I just wrote what I thought. What was I missing?  Did I even know that I was missing something?  I loved teaching and knew my way but only my way and not much else.

After about seven years, I was told that students from another school were coming, Ross University School of Medicine (RUSM).  Ok, students showed up, and not much changed.  I placed a lot of importance on all of the clinical matters but not much on academic.  However, after a couple of years I managed to make it to one of the leadership conferences that RUSM holds every year.  Great trip, I thought.  I did my job, I went to all the lectures, but there was one thing.  I had no idea what they were talking about.  It was like they were speaking a different language, a foreign language.

They were speaking the language of education, more important, the language of medical education.  I felt completely ignorant.  No one had ever taught me that. I was never exposed to it.  Maybe you can imagine how I felt.  I thought of all of the family medicine residents that I had taught.  I thought of all of the OB/GYN residents that I had taught.  I thought even more about all of the students that I had taught.

I thought maybe I should apologize.  How many might I have let down, not understood.  How many different ways are there to learn?  What was extremely important that I had just missed? Maybe I wasn't doing such a good job.

So, medical students everywhere: I apologize. 

But that is the past.  Over the past few years I have tried to change, tried to learn the language, tried to grow and you know what happened.  I have learned to expect more from myself.  I have learned to expect more from students.  I have learned how to push a little, pull a little, accept a little and give a lot more.  I am still learning.  I still feel ignorant sometimes, but not as much. Now I know that teaching medicine requires more than practicing medicine.

Medical education is our responsibility; it never stops and it goes on forever.

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Tags: Academics

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CHIEF RESIDENT: Anesthesiology Resident Reflects on Career Path

March 16, 2016

<P ALIGN=Center>Dipan Patel, MD<br>Chief Resident<br/>Department of Anesthesiology<br>New York Medical College<br/>

Dipan Patel, MD
Chief Resident
Department of Anesthesiology
New York Medical College

RUSM alumnus Dipan Patel, MD, Class of 2012, is a Chief Resident in the Department of Anesthesiology at New York Medical College. Dr. Patel shares his perspective on how to achieve career goals in medicine.

RUSM: What attracted you to RUSM?

PATEL: I was enrolled in a six-year Doctor of Pharmacy program and I had two close friends who attended Ross University [School of Medicine].  They spoke highly about their experience and how prepared they felt after successfully completing their licensing exams.  Their guidance was influential in my decision to leave pharmacy, in the back of my mind I had always wanted to become a physician. When I fully committed to pursuing my dream, the admissions counselors and administrative staff were very helpful in my transition process.

RUSM: How did you prepare for the NRMP® Match?

PATEL: Preparation for The MATCH℠ started with clinical rotations.  The clinical rotation sites at which I rotated offered opportunities within their respective hospitals to work directly with residents in all major sub-specialties and see what it took to build the skills necessary to obtain a residency.

RUSM: What are the top two or three ways RUSM helped prepare you for your residency position?

PATEL: RUSM arranged participation in strong clinical rotation sites with in-house residency programs. There were also helpful administrative staff members who facilitated and ensured that the ERAS® and NRMP process went smoothly (especially in regards to documentation, ECFMG® certification, etc.).

RUSM: What are the key factors that led to you achieving a chief resident position?

PATEL: Obtaining a position as chief resident is not something that happens overnight.  It starts the day you begin medical school.  You have the ability to decide the type of physician you want to be when you start, and it is up to you to maintain that drive until you reach your goal.   

RUSM: What additional responsibilities have you assumed since becoming a chief resident?

PATEL: As a chief resident, serving on influential committees and taking on administrative roles is only the beginning.  I have developed a joy in participating in major specialty societies (American Society of Anesthesiologists) and sub-specialty society committees in order to stay actively involved in my field.  Recently, I have taken on an active role as Vice Chairman of the North American Neuromodulation Society’s Residents and Fellows Committee for 2015-2016. 

RUSM: What’s next for you?

PATEL: I will be completing residency in June 2016, and I look forward to joining a private practice anesthesiology group and staying actively involved in major societies and committees within our specialty.

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Tags: Residency , Alumni , New York

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THE PLEDGE: RUSM Joins American Cancer Society to Fight Colorectal Cancer

March 14, 2016

Left to right: <b>Congressman Donald Payne, Jr. </b>(NJ-10);  <b>Jason Plaia</b>, senior manager, American Cancer Society; <b>Lynly Jeanlouis</b>, alumni relations coordinator, Ross University School of Medicine; <b>Dr. Alvaro Carrascal</b>, VP of Health Systems, American Cancer Society; <b>Nicole Pride</b>, communications manager, Ross University School of Medicine; <b>Timothy Prol</b>, Esp., Director of Operations, New Jersey Primary Care Association

Left to right: Congressman Donald Payne, Jr. (NJ-10); Jason Plaia, senior manager, American Cancer Society; Lynly Jeanlouis, alumni relations coordinator, Ross University School of Medicine; Dr. Alvaro Carrascal, VP of Health Systems, American Cancer Society; Nicole Pride, communications manager, Ross University School of Medicine; Timothy Prol, Esp., Director of Operations, New Jersey Primary Care Association

During a recent signing ceremony in New Jersey, Ross University School of Medicine recently pledged to help increase colorectal cancer screening rates by supporting the 80% by 2018 initiative, led by the American Cancer Society (ACS), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable (an organization co-founded by ACS and CDC).

“Having lost my father too early in life to colorectal cancer, I know firsthand the seriousness of this disease and the importance of early detection,” said Congressman Donald M. Payne, Jr. (NJ-10) who shared remarks at the ceremony. “Colorectal cancer is highly preventable and treatable—but you have to catch it early. By increasing awareness and screening rates, we can save thousands of lives in New Jersey, keeping families whole and our communities strong. That is why I am proud to endorse the 80% by 2018 Initiative and pledge to do all that I can to help achieve this goal to prevent and eliminate colorectal cancer.”

According to ACS, colorectal cancer is the nation’s second-leading cause of cancer-related deaths; however it is one of only a few cancers that can be prevented. Through proper colorectal cancer screening, doctors can find and remove hidden growths (called “polyps”) in the colon, before they become cancerous. Removing polyps can prevent cancer altogether.

“80% by 2018” is a National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable (NCCRT) initiative in which over five hundred  organizations have committed to substantially reducing colorectal cancer as a major public health problem and are working toward the shared goal of 80% of adults aged 50 and older being regularly screened for colorectal cancer by 2018.  Leading public health organizations, such as ACS, CDC and the NCCRT are rallying organizations to embrace this shared goal.

“We are thrilled to join the cause to improve colorectal cancer screening rates,” said Nicole Pride, communications manager at RUSM. “We will help to educate our nearly 12,000 alumni, particularly those who specialize in primary care, on what they can do to encourage patients who are over 50 years of age about getting screened. Together, we can help to eliminate colorectal cancer as a major public health problem.”

“Colorectal cancer is a major public health problem. Adults age 50 and older should be regularly screened for it. There are several screening options, including take home tests,” said Dr. Alvaro Carrascal, Vice President of Health Systems for the American Cancer Society. “Colorectal cancer can be prevented or detected early through appropriate screening and tens of thousands of lives can be saved if we increase screening to reach 80% by 2018."

Part of the 80% by 2018 goal is to leverage the energy of multiple and diverse partners to empower communities, patients, providers to increase screening rates. The 80% by 2018 initiative consists of health care providers, health systems, communities, businesses, community health centers, government, non-profit organizations and patient advocacy groups who are committed to getting more people screened for colorectal cancer to prevent more cancers and save lives.

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Tags: Community Service

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CARMS: Dana Trafford (RUSM ’16) Heading Home to Canada for Residency

March 10, 2016

When Dana Trafford (Class of 2016) set out to earn her medical degree at Ross University School of Medicine (RUSM), her goal was to match in a residency back home in Canada. And she knew it might not be easy—matching through the Canadian Resident Matching Service (CaRMS) is known to be competitive, especially for international medical graduates.

But knowing that ended up driving her, pushing her work even harder.

“[It] gave me the drive to work that much harder when I came across people who had stigmas about international medical graduates, or those who didn’t believe a Canadian residency was obtainable,” says Trafford, a graduate of York University and resident of Brampton, Ontario.

Her hard work paid off. She just attained an internal medicine residency at Western University in the first iteration of the 2016 CaRMS.  

“I feel amazing,” she says. “It’s the hardest I’ve ever worked, but I’m so thankful that I persevered, and I couldn’t have done it without so many people supporting me through the process.”

She adds that RUSM has an active community of Canadian students that proved invaluable during her time at RUSM—her fellow Canadian students would help her with things like housing, visas, and navigating Canadian exams. And she’s grateful to RUSM for giving her the educational tools she needed to earn her MD, she says.

“There were many growing pains over the past few years,” she says. “And looking back now, I’m thankful for them, because they’ve made me a more evolved person and a better physician.”

Looking ahead, Trafford hopes to complete a fellowship in geriatric medicine after residency.

“The geriatric population is a huge area for new research,” she says. “I would love to participate in finding new avenues to improve this population’s quality of life.”

Other RUSM Stories About Residency Success in Canada

Tags: Canada , Residency

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RESIDENCY: OSPD Has Been Preparing RUSM Students for Their Match Moment for Months

March 07, 2016

Match Day is almost here, and the Office of Student and Professional Development (OSPD) at Ross University School of Medicine (RUSM) has been hard at work for months helping making sure students’ personal statements are top-notch, their interview skills are as sharp as they can get, and that they’re applying for residency placements best suited to their individual skills, career goals, and personal interests.

“Applying for residency can be a complicated process for those who aren’t familiar with it,” says Gary Belotzerkovsky, assistant dean of clinical student affairs. “Our team has years of experience working directly with students applying for the National Resident Matching Program, and we’re here to help each individual maximize their results during the residency process.”

In terms of residency prep, OSPD is divided up into three distinct sections—career development, writing, and licensing/credentialing.

Career Development and Advising

OSPD career advisors start guiding RUSM students early, during their time in Internal Medicine Foundations (the six-week-long clerkship that marks each student’s entry into RUSM’s clinical sciences curriculum). OSPD is with them for students’ full two years of clinicals, and when it’s time to prepare for residency, advisors assist students by providing them with information on what medical specialty fits them best.

“Each student has his or her individual strengths, and part of the career advisors’ work involves pinpointing those strengths and helping them select the medical specialty that fits them best,” Belotzerkovsky says. “That’s a big part of our job—making sure that a student’s residency of choice aligns not just with their academic strengths, but with their personal interests as well.”

After the applications are in, though, career advisors help even more by conducting mock residency interviews with students, either in person at RUSM’s Miramar location, or via Skype® or telephone. For students who do not attain a residency through the NRMP© Main Residency Match, career advisors help students find other job or placement options while waiting for the next cycle.

OSPD Writers

You may not have known this, but applying for residency involves lots of supporting documentation. Luckily, students can count on the OSPD’s writing team to help them out.

For Students: OSPD writers review and edit students’ personal statements and curriculum vitae (CV). These important documents are both required to apply to graduate medical education programs, and the OSPD team is charged with helping ensure they’re as polished as possible.

For Residency Program Directors: The OSPD writing team is also in charge of collecting information for, and drafting, a student’s Medical Student Performance Evaluation (MSPE), an important part of the residency application process. The MSPE is an important part of each student’s academic record, and traces their performance in medical school starting from year one.

The OSPD team will upload all official documentation, including academic transcripts and the MSPE, to the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG). That’s the official application service used to submit residency applications for Caribbean medical schools.

Licensing and Credentialing Department

This department works closely with the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG) to make sure all RUSM graduates are ECFMG-certified. ECFMG certification is required before any international medical graduate can start residency in the US—it’s also a requirement to take the United States Medical Licensure Examination® (USMLE) Step 3.

Then, when it comes time for graduates to attain licensure in any of the 50 US states and Puerto Rico, the OSPD’s licensing/credentialing analysts are on hand to complete those tasks on graduates’ behalf. “We also work with our alumni and credential them for new hospital jobs or for new state licensure,” Belotzerkovsky says.

As Match Day approaches, be sure to check the RUSM blog and website for NRMP results, graduate profiles, success stories, and more.

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Tags: Residency , Students

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RESIDENCY: RUSM Students Attain Residencies in 2016 CaRMS Match

March 03, 2016

Congratulations to our Canadian Ross University School of Medicine (RUSM) students on attaining residencies through the Canadian Resident Matching Service (CaRMS) first iteration. RUSM students attained residencies in family medicine, pediatrics, and internal medicine programs at University of Ottawa, University of Saskatchewan, and Western University.

Results for the second iteration of CaRMS will be released in April.

Check this blog over the next few days for profiles of Canadian RUSM students who matched through CaRMS in 2016. In the meantime, see below for detailed profiles of RUSM graduates who attained residencies through CaRMS in 2015.

Are you a Canadian resident interested in attending RUSM? Check out our Canadian Applicants page for useful resources and content.

 

Tags: Canada , Residency

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CHIEF RESIDENT: Alumnus Talks about Career in Emergency Medicine

March 02, 2016

RUSM alumnus Deepak Vatti, MD, Chief Resident, State University of New York's Upstate Medical University

RUSM alumnus Deepak Vatti, MD, Chief Resident, State University of New York's Upstate Medical University

RUSM alumnus Deepak Vatti, MD, is completing an Emergency Medicine residency program at State University of New York's Upstate Medical University in Syracuse. Dr. Vatti paused from his demanding schedule to talk about his experience at RUSM and his role as chief resident.
 
RUSM: What attracted you to RUSM?

DEEPAK: Ross University School of Medicine offered me a scholarship and allowed me to start in January. I was working as an EMT while also running a business called SpinoFlex that manufactures a device that helps people walk again after a spinal chord injury or stroke. The flexible start time at RUSM allowed me to make a smoother transition from my two jobs.

RUSM: How did you prepare for the NRMP® Match?


DEEPAK: I knew that I wanted to specialize in Emergency Medicine so I did all of my rotations in that specialty. I also made sure to rotate in hospitals that offered the potential for a residency so that the faculty would get to know me and I would develop an intimate knowledge of the hospital. In addition, I studied hard for the [USMLE®] Step exams because those scores indicate to residency programs whether you will be likely to pass your specialty-specific boards.

RUSM: What are the top two or three ways RUSM helped prepare you for your residency position?

DEEPAK: At RUSM I learned to be adaptable and go with the flow. I learned to overcome any obstacle and not become frustrated by the little things. There is a distinct personality you’ll find in people who graduate from RUSM. The students who succeed there tend to be leaders in whatever they do. They work hard, show up early, stay late, and understand that a lot of work goes into residency. For that reason, they seem to have an easier time making the transition. In addition, by virtue of being foreign medical grads, RUSM students learn to be organized and efficient with complex administrative processes instead of becoming frustrated by them. RUSM is almost like a boot camp – a lot of my friends from RUSM have become chief residents.

RUSM: What are the key factors that led to you achieving a chief resident position?

DEEPAK: My clinical rotations gave me a broad perspective on the practice of medicine. I did rotations in Miami, New York, Chicago, Louisiana, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, and Maryland. In each of these hospitals I was able to see how medicine is performed, observe how different people solve problems, and identify common threads. This allows me to bring creative solutions to the table.

RUSM: What additional responsibilities have you assumed since becoming a chief resident?

DEEPAK: At SUNY Upstate, chief residents are in charge of the schedule for all of the residents that rotate through the emergency department. This is a unique challenge because we have an increasing volume in the hospital and we have to be efficient with the residents and not burn them out. We are also on the committee that is responsible for curriculum changes, and we advocate for residents during conflict resolutions.

RUSM: What’s next for you?

DEEPAK: I will be Associate Director of an Emergency Department in New Hampshire, where I’m from.  I am also staying on as faculty at SUNY Upstate Medical University.

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Tags: New York , Emergency Medicine , Alumni , Residency

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