Ross University Blog

CHIEF RESIDENT: Alum Tells His Couples Match Experience with Wife, RUSM Alumna

April 25, 2016

RUSM alumnus Brian Kendall, MD, Class of 2013, is Chief Resident in the Department of Emergency Medicine at The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas.

RUSM: What attracted you to RUSM?

Kendall: My wife and I were married for a year prior to applying for medical school and we wanted to attend the same school.  Ross [University School of Medicine] interviewed us both and made us feel welcome by inviting us to interview on the same day and meeting with us individually and as a couple.  It was a great experience and we knew that we would fit in well.
 
RUSM: How did you prepare for the NRMP® Match?

Kendall: We began preparing on the first day of medical school, by hunkering down and studying constantly.  We knew we would have to work hard to get the residencies we wanted (my wife is a general surgery resident), and so we would wake up early every morning Monday through Friday, head to the classroom to study before class, stay in class from 8 a.m. - 5 p.m., and then stay after class and continue to study until 10 p.m.  Saturdays we studied from 7 a.m. - 7 p.m.  Sundays we would still study, but we also tried to rest and enjoy the island. 

Once off the island, we put all our effort into excelling at our rotations.  During interview season, we attended our respective national meetings to attend the residency fair and meet with programs from around the country.  We applied to a lot of programs since we were couples matching. We each had a call and email list, and we would reach out to each program every one to two weeks until we got an interview, or until they gave us an absolute “no.”  My wife ended up with 12 general surgery categorical interviews, I ended up with 18 emergency medicine interviews.  Even after all that, the couples-match did not work for us, as we got ranked to match at different places. Fortunately, it all worked out in the end.

RUSM: What are the top two or three ways RUSM helped prepare you for your residency position?

Kendall: Ross [University School of Medicine] instilled a mindset that you have to work hard to achieve what you want; nothing is just handed to you on a silver platter. 

The hospital at which we rotated, which was in Saginaw, Mich., was a great place to complete rotations. I got to do over 10 central lines, 10 arterial lines, 15 intubations, and a couple of other procedures, which put me well ahead of the game for residency.

Ross [University School of Medicine] also teaches you to think and work independently.

RUSM: What are the key factors that led to you achieving a chief resident position?

Kendall: I am personable, positive and easy to work with.  I have always enjoyed leadership positions, and feel comfortable in those roles.  

RUSM: What additional responsibilities have you assumed since becoming a chief resident?

Kendall: I'm on a couple of different committees.  My wife and I are completing residencies in different states, so our 4-year-old son and I are here in Dallas, so that is also a lot of responsibility!

RUSM: What’s next for you?

Kendall: I have a job lined up at an independent Emergency Medicine group in southeast Michigan, where my wife is a resident. Our son and I will join her there in July!
 

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Tags: Chief Resident , Alumni , Texas

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VIEWPOINT: Who Should Get to Be a Doctor?

April 19, 2016

Every year, United States medical schools are forced to turn away qualified applicants because they simply don’t have seats for them. But with the U.S. facing a shortage of as many as 90,000 doctors, it’s critical that we provide opportunities for those deserving aspiring doctors who are ready to be part of the solution.

But who should get to be a doctor? Joseph Flaherty, MD, dean and chancellor at Ross University School of Medicine (RUSM), believes we have to look closely at how we evaluate and select medical school candidates if we’re going to not only increase the number of doctors we have, but also find the ones suited to solving our most pressing healthcare challenges.

Read more in his piece on Medium.

Tags: Students , Faculty

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CARMS: Student Heading Back to Hometown for IM Residency

April 18, 2016

Mike Radford, a 2015 RUSM grad, attained a residency this year at Western University, in his hometown of London, Ontario.

Mike Radford, a 2015 RUSM grad, attained a residency this year at Western University, in his hometown of London, Ontario.

Mike Radford learned a lot during his time at Ross University School of Medicine (RUSM), but one lesson stands out that has nothing to do with disease pathologies, anatomy, or biomedicine. It has to do with taking personal responsibility, and about putting your heart and soul into achieving your goals—regardless of what obstacles get thrown at you.

Radford, a 2015 RUSM graduate who attended McMaster University for undergrad, wasn’t able to secure a seat at a Canadian medical school. That didn’t stop him, though—he found his opportunity at RUSM. Another potential obstacle on his road to residency: He knew that at the end of the day, matching back home in Canada wasn’t going to be easy, as matching through the Canadian Resident Matching Service (CaRMS) is notoriously competitive. 

The common thread here is that Radford didn’t give up. And it paid off.

Matching for Residency Right Back in His Hometown

This year, Radford matched to Western University in London, ON—his hometown—through the first iteration of CaRMS, and he’s thrilled to be heading back home to start his internal medicine residency. “I always wanted to pick an area of medicine that involved a challenge, continuous mental stimulation, and patient interaction,” he says of his chosen specialty.

Throughout his education at RUSM, Radford had support from his school—in particular, he credited RUSM clinical advisor Dodson James and Canadian advisors Tom Harkness and Chuck Furey—but he also realized the onus of matching in Canada rested, ultimately, on what he was willing to put in to his education. He earned his residency, he says, by holding himself accountable for his own success through hard work, dedication, and commitment.

“I learned that the responsibility was on me to achieve my goals, and not on administration, professors, or other faculty members,” Radford says. “Nothing is impossible—you can be successful. You just have to stay focused and dedicate yourself to achieving your goals.”

Looking Ahead

As far as future plans go, Radford is in something of a wait-and-see phase. He’s still mulling the idea of a critical care or hematology/oncology fellowship, but he plans on seeing whether he changes his mind and goes in a different direction based on his residency experience.

To future RUSM students from Canada, Radford has this to say: Work as hard as you can, with no regrets.

“RUSM gives Canadian students an opportunity to pursue medicine where it may not have been possible in Canada,” says Radford. “Take advantage of this opportunity and never stop working to be a better, smarter, more confident individual, and you will succeed and be recognized.”

Radford starts residency at Western in July.

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Tags: Residency , Canada

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What RUSM Students Learned at the U of Miami/Florida Bioethics Network Annual Meeting

April 18, 2016

Avery Carter, back row, left, Dr. Mucciola, Prathayini Muthiah, Nicholas Alexander, Kenneth Goodman, PhD, director of the Florida Bioethics Network and director of the UM Institute for Bioethics and Health Policy, Abigail House. In the front row: Ryan Shibata, left, Christen Kelley, Ellexis Khan, and Shannon Dorton.

Avery Carter, back row, left, Dr. Mucciola, Prathayini Muthiah, Nicholas Alexander, Kenneth Goodman, PhD, director of the Florida Bioethics Network and director of the UM Institute for Bioethics and Health Policy, Abigail House. In the front row: Ryan Shibata, left, Christen Kelley, Ellexis Khan, and Shannon Dorton.

For the ninth year in a row, Ross University School of Medicine (RUSM) co-sponsored the University of Miami/Florida Bioethics Network annual meeting. This year’s event, “Florida Bioethics: Debates, Decisions, Solutions” was held in Miami on April 8.

“This is a chance to meet with, and engage in a dialogue with experts in the field, practicing MDs and medical students from other universities,” said RUSM’s Robert N. Mucciola, MD, MA (Bioethics), FACOG Professor and Chairman, Obstetrics and Gynecology. “The general objectives center on the appreciation and assessment of the role and importance of bioethics in clinical and institutional decision making.”

Dr. Mucciola has spearheaded RUSM's involvement with this important conference from the beginning, and has organized the attendance of a number of our students, with registration fees waived. Students traveled from as far away as California, Chicago, New York and Maryland to attend.

“No matter what field of medicine you go into, the topics discussed apply to you, ” said student Nicholas Alexander.

Instilling a Culture of Caring

Student participants came away from the conference with a renewed appreciation for the physician's role in ensuring patients' needs and desires are met. “This meeting gave insight on how to follow medical ethics within the guidelines of legislation," said California native Ryan Shibata. "Although the laws may be slightly ambiguous, it’s our job as physicians to make sure that our patients’ wishes are not.”

"The most important thing I learned at this meeting was to have compassion toward patients and make their wishes your priority," said Ellexis Khan, a third-year student, "especially when it comes to end-of-life care."

Third-year student Avery Carter echoed their sentiments. “We must be wary not to become so consumed in 'medicine' that we lose sight of the reason for our work, and that, simply, is to care for the patient," said Carter. "In all areas, we must care.”  

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Tags: Students , Faculty

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VIDEO: The Joy of Matching

April 12, 2016

On Match Day this year, hundreds of graduates of Ross University School of Medicine (RUSM) found out where they are headed for residency training in 2016. Check out this video from our Match celebrations in New York, Chicago, and Miami and join us in congratulating them on their achievements.

Tags: Residency

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CHIEF RESIDENT: Preparation was Key to Alum Landing His Ideal Residency

April 12, 2016

Dr. Grant K. Studebaker, class of 2013, gives his strategy for landing his preferred residency program at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center in Jackson.

RUSM: What attracted you to RUSM?

Studebaker: What stood out for me was that RUSM takes a close look at applicants’ character and previous work experience; it views each student as a person and not just a score.  This approach was particularly evident during my interview.  The interviewer wanted to learn about who I was as a person, what I did in my previous jobs, and why I wanted to be a doctor. The conversation was very personable and not just focused on my academic performance and scores.

RUSM: How did you prepare for the NRMP® Match?

Studebaker: I studied hard at RUSM and for the USMLE® step exams.  I knew that I wanted to do my residency in family medicine so I did my electives in primary care to gain more experience.  When it was time for the Match, I narrowed down my search to my preferred geographical areas and made a list of all family medicine programs in each area, with a focus on academic settings and unopposed programs.  After creating that initial list, I looked closely at faculty, current residents, and the atmosphere of each program to find the one right for me.

RUSM: What are the top two or three ways RUSM helped prepare you for your residency position?

Studebaker: The academic experience at RUSM more than prepared me for success in residency.  Being a “Rossie” is more than just academics, however. By starting in Dominica and then traveling for rotations we learn to overcome any obstacle and adapt to any situation. This prepares us for the rigors of residency and allows us to be very successful.

RUSM: What are the key factors that led to you achieving a chief resident position?

Studebaker: Being named a chief resident was an honor. I believe the unique experience I had at RUSM helped prepare me for this position. During my clinical years, I had to stay very organized to be able to navigate scheduling my rotations, traveling, as well as studying.  Also, by always being in a new place for rotations I learned how to quickly become social and interact with people from various backgrounds.

RUSM: What additional responsibilities have you assumed since becoming a chief resident?

Studebaker: As chief resident, I am responsible for creating the schedules for all other residents.  This is a unique challenge as we are in an incredibly busy program with rotations in various specialties and community services, as well as in our clinic.  At the start of the year I was responsible for academic review and reviewing our residency manual for changes.  I am also responsible for orienting and lecturing to interns at the start of their training.  Once a month, I create a Medical Jeopardy lecture covering the latest Family Medicine Journal.  I also serve on various committees at the hospital and within our program. My most important duty, however, is to act as a liaison between faculty and residents, handling any conflict that arises.  

RUSM: What’s next for you?

Studebaker: After completing my residency program I will stay at the University of Tennessee–Jackson as faculty.

 

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Tags: Chief Resident , Alumni , Tennessee

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CHIEF RESIDENT: Dr. Kemple Reviews Essential Skills Needed to Obtain, and then Excel in a Residency

April 04, 2016

Daniel Kemple, MD, Class of 2013, is a chief resident in the Emergency Medicine program at the University of Toledo.

RUSM: What attracted you to RUSM?
Kemple: A friend from my undergraduate institution was a student at Ross [University School of Medicine] and recommended it. The most important reasons I chose to attend were the school’s reputation, 50-state approval, and the provision of federal loans. These factors are so important when looking at Caribbean [medical] schools.

RUSM: How did you prepare for the NRMP® Match?
Kemple: I participated in mock interviews held by my clinical training site. I also consulted Ross [University School of Medicine] faculty for guidance with regard to filling out my ERAS (Electronic Residency Application Service) application.

RUSM: What are the top two or three ways RUSM helped prepare you for your residency position?
Kemple: First, I gained the knowledge and skills necessary to transition from undergraduate student to medical student and then to physician. Second, it was clear from the first day that Ross [University School of Medicine] took all academic matters seriously and instituted a sense of responsibility for your patients and actions. This is essential for any successful physician and residency programs want residents who exemplify these qualities.

RUSM: What are the key factors that led to you achieving a chief resident position?
Kemple: Every program is slightly different in the way it selects chief residents. The University of Toledo looks at academic performance on training exams, clinical performance, evaluations, and a vote by all faculty and residents. Ultimately, however, the selection is up to the Program Director. I believe what made me stand out was excelling in all of these areas and finding ways to contribute to the big picture by looking beyond my residency program – looking at my specialty of emergency medicine and the hospital as a whole. For example, I recently served as Chairman for the Emergency Medicine Residents’ Association (EMRA) Awards Committee and I currently serve on the hospital’s laboratory utilization review committee.

RUSM: What additional responsibilities have you assumed since becoming a chief resident?
Kemple: In addition to serving as a member of the laboratory utilization review committee, I am responsible for scheduling two facilities, attending faculty meetings, helping assimilate new interns into the program, and performing additional resident-related tasks.

RUSM: What’s next for you?
Kemple: After graduation, I will work for a local democratic emergency medicine group in the Toledo area for two years while my fiancé (also a RUSM grad) finishes her residency.

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Tags: Chief Resident , Alumni , Ohio

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