Ross University Blog

CLINICAL SPOTLIGHT: New Clinical Track Program in Ohio

December 15, 2016

Ross University School of Medicine is pleased to announce a new clinical track site at Western Reserve Health Education (WHRE) in Youngstown, Ohio. Through this partnership, Ross students will have the opportunity to complete a full 48-week clinical track program at WHRE. This third-year program will be comprised of six core clerkships: Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, OB/GYN, Pediatrics, Psychiatry and Surgery.

WHRE is an acute care facility offering a variety of health care services to a diverse patient population. A major teaching hospital, WHRE sponsors Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) -approved programs in Family Medicine, Internal Medicine and Surgery, training more than 60 residents per year.

Ross students will rotate through WHRE at the Northside Medical Center campus, a university-affiliated hospital offering inpatient, surgical, emergency, diagnostic, and surgical services. The newly renovated hospital is a designated Level III trauma center providing outstanding, award-winning patient care. In addition, Northside Medical Center is a Primary Stroke Center certified by The Joint Commission and has also received The Joint Commission’s Gold Seal of Approval for total hip and knee replacement procedures.

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Tags: Clinical Sciences , Ohio

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SCHOLARSHIP: Student, Mother, Nurse Follows Childhood Dream to MD

July 13, 2016

Rewaida Hall, Class of 2020, recipient of the Eliza Ann Grier scholarship

Rewaida Hall, Class of 2020, recipient of the Eliza Ann Grier scholarship

On a visit to the doctor’s office at age 9, Rewaida Hall didn’t sit quietly on the exam table and wait for the medical staff to ask her questions. Instead, she informed the nurses and doctor that she already knew what had her under the weather: measles. She showed them the spots on her skin, rattled off the rest of her symptoms, and considered the matter settled.

“The doctor smiled and asked what I wanted to be when I grew up,” says Hall, “and I replied without hesitation, ‘a doctor.’”

It hardly needed to be said. Even without her self-diagnosis, Hall’s natural inclination to be a doctor was plain from the outset. She would gather the neighborhood kids and set up a mock hospital, analyzing their symptoms, providing a diagnosis and treating their illness with candy (much to her mother’s dismay). Then, when Hall entered secondary school, she followed an educational track designed for students with an interest in health science. When she received an assignment to interview a community figure who inspired her, she chose a physician.

It seemed all the pieces were falling into place. Until they weren’t.

A Dream Deferred

Hall grew up in an extended family setting in Ghana alongside her cousins and their respective families. As she was in the same age cohort as two of her male cousins, the three of them went through all their rites of passage together. However, Hall was designated the nurse of the family, while the two males had the choice of being a physician or an engineer.

So medicine was pushed to the back burner as Hall entered college at the University of Akron in Ohio. There, she discovered a burgeoning interest in geography and anthropology. Although she had pivoted outside of healthcare, Hall thought this might provide another avenue to make a positive difference in people’s lives—through building healthier communities. So she earned her bachelor’s degree in geography and planning, followed by two master’s degrees in geography and planning, and public administration.

Hall interned for the city of Akron in the planning department. But her hopes of satisfying the desire to have a direct impact on people quickly faded.

“I realized I couldn’t effect nearly as much change as I thought,” says Hall.

She returned to school yet again and completed the accelerated nursing program her family had always wanted. Working as a nurse in the clinical setting, she had much more direct interaction in caring for people. But at the same time, the constant contact with practicing physicians only exacerbated her feeling of discontent.

“Every day I worked with physicians and saw how much of a difference their knowledge and expertise made in patients’ lives,” Hall says. “That’s what convinced me I wouldn’t be satisfied until I had my MD.”

"Don't Let Anyone Say You Can't Do It"

Now, with the support of her husband and children, Hall is continuing the journey she started long ago to become a physician. She is the recipient of the Eliza Ann Grier scholarship, offered to incoming first-semester students from under-represented minority groups in the field of medicine.

“Don’t let anyone say you can’t do it because of your age, who you are or where you come from,” says Hall. “If you have the desire and are willing to put in the effort, you can do it.”

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Tags: Scholarships , Ohio , Nurse

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CHIEF RESIDENT: Dr. Kemple Reviews Essential Skills Needed to Obtain, and then Excel in a Residency

April 04, 2016

Daniel Kemple, MD, Class of 2013, is a chief resident in the Emergency Medicine program at the University of Toledo.

RUSM: What attracted you to RUSM?
Kemple: A friend from my undergraduate institution was a student at Ross [University School of Medicine] and recommended it. The most important reasons I chose to attend were the school’s reputation, 50-state approval, and the provision of federal loans. These factors are so important when looking at Caribbean [medical] schools.

RUSM: How did you prepare for the NRMP® Match?
Kemple: I participated in mock interviews held by my clinical training site. I also consulted Ross [University School of Medicine] faculty for guidance with regard to filling out my ERAS (Electronic Residency Application Service) application.

RUSM: What are the top two or three ways RUSM helped prepare you for your residency position?
Kemple: First, I gained the knowledge and skills necessary to transition from undergraduate student to medical student and then to physician. Second, it was clear from the first day that Ross [University School of Medicine] took all academic matters seriously and instituted a sense of responsibility for your patients and actions. This is essential for any successful physician and residency programs want residents who exemplify these qualities.

RUSM: What are the key factors that led to you achieving a chief resident position?
Kemple: Every program is slightly different in the way it selects chief residents. The University of Toledo looks at academic performance on training exams, clinical performance, evaluations, and a vote by all faculty and residents. Ultimately, however, the selection is up to the Program Director. I believe what made me stand out was excelling in all of these areas and finding ways to contribute to the big picture by looking beyond my residency program – looking at my specialty of emergency medicine and the hospital as a whole. For example, I recently served as Chairman for the Emergency Medicine Residents’ Association (EMRA) Awards Committee and I currently serve on the hospital’s laboratory utilization review committee.

RUSM: What additional responsibilities have you assumed since becoming a chief resident?
Kemple: In addition to serving as a member of the laboratory utilization review committee, I am responsible for scheduling two facilities, attending faculty meetings, helping assimilate new interns into the program, and performing additional resident-related tasks.

RUSM: What’s next for you?
Kemple: After graduation, I will work for a local democratic emergency medicine group in the Toledo area for two years while my fiancé (also a RUSM grad) finishes her residency.

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Tags: Chief Resident , Alumni , Ohio

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Chief Resident: Dr. Lee Talks about Her Start in Emergency Medicine

March 30, 2016

Ginny Lee, MD, Class of 2013, is a Chief Resident in the Department of Emergency Medicine at Summa Akron City Hospital in Akron, Ohio.


RUSM: What attracted you to RUSM?

LEE: I appreciated the flexibility of its start dates, the Caribbean location, and having a different experience than I would have had in the United States.

RUSM: How did you prepare for the NRMP® Match?

LEE: I took several personality quizzes, interviewed at as many places as possible, and rotated at those I was very interested in.

RUSM: How did RUSM help prepare you for your residency position?

LEE: RUSM molded my study habits, taught me efficiency, and prepared me to be ready for anything.

RUSM: What are the key factors that led to you achieving a chief resident position?

LEE: I wanted to find a way I could serve the residency that gave me such a wonderful opportunity. In return, the chief resident position has taught me leadership skills. 

RUSM: What additional responsibilities have you assumed since becoming a chief resident?

LEE: I became the education chief and have enjoyed creating the academic schedule for the residency, including weekly conferences. This allowed me to interact and communicate with, as well as learn from, many great speakers and educators.

RUSM: What’s next for you?

LEE: I will be working with an Emergency Medicine group in Ohio, taking many vacations and conferences. Also, I will get married in the next year to an amazing man I met at Ross [University School of Medicine]!

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Tags: Chief resident , Alumni , Ohio

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LIVESTREAM: Watch the Jan. 15, 2016 White Coat Ceremony at 1 PM ET

January 01, 2016

Jason Lester, MD, RUSM Class of 2016, is the White Coat SpeakerUpdated 4:30 PM ET, 1/15/2016, with link to recorded version

Ross University School of Medicine's (RUSM) winter 2016 White Coat Ceremony will take place on Friday, Jan. 15 beginning at 1:30 PM UTC (12:30 PM EST) with the ceremony starting at 2 PM UTC (1 PM ET) in Dominica.

The ceremony will also be broadcast live via RUSM's webcast. Go here to watch.

Featured Speaker: Jason Lester, MD (Class of 2006), Emergency Medicine Physician

Emergency Medicine Physician Jason Lester, MD, (RUSM ‘06) will be the guest speaker for the ceremony. Currently, he is the attending physician, Department of Emergency Medicine, and assistant medical director, Department of Emergency Medicine, at Mercy St. Charles Hospital in Oregon, Ohio. He is a Fellow of the American College of Emergency Physicians, a Diplomate of the American Board of Emergency Medicine and a Diplomate of the National Board of Medical Examiners. He completed his residency in emergency medicine at St. Vincent’s Mercy Medical Center in Toledo, Ohio.

Read a comprehensive Q&A with Dr. Lester on our blog. 

Recorded Video for the Jan. 15 White Coat Ceremony

Did you miss the live webcast of this year's winter 2016 ceremony? Never fear: We recorded it.

Watch the recorded video of the White Coat Ceremony here.

Tags: Campus , Ohio

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RUSM student Edwin “Ned” Palmer matches in Medicine-Pediatrics program at University of Cincinnati

March 21, 2014

Edwin “Ned” Palmer, on track to graduate from RUSM with the class of 2014 and begin a MedPeds residency program at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center, is interested in a specialty that serves patients who have never existed before. They are people with developmental problems, and pediatric diseases who are surviving into adulthood thanks to advances in medicine during the past two decades, he explained. “It’s a fascinating area of medicine called transitional care, for an underserved patient population with looming diagnoses from childhood,” Palmer said.

Palmer, a native of Michigan, who earned his undergraduate degree from McGill University in Canada, found the tropical Dominica campus of RUSM “stunningly beautiful, geographically.” But, he said, there was also “asymmetrical distribution of resources in medicine” in the developing country, creating conditions that “we had in the U.S. 40 years ago.” Still, he noted, “You can go to areas in the U.S. that are just as poorly served.”

Always interested in “travel and exploration,” Palmer chose to do an elective in the Himalayas, where he was part of a team “providing primary care for several regions in Northern India,” he said. “We’d go into areas that were geographically isolated, set up full-service clinics, with a pharmacy, and hundreds of patients would come. They were subsistence farmers who had little to no transportation and many walked in.”

Palmer’s global experience with an incredibly diverse population has led him to an awareness that, “There’s a flexibility to human expectation. There’s an understanding that at any moment, anything can go wrong.”

Tags: Alumni , Residency , Ohio

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