Dr. Rodgers received his undergraduate, graduate, and medical degrees from Brown University, and performed his residency and chief residency in internal medicine at Barnes Hospital and the Washington University School of Medicine.  His fellowship training in hematology was in a joint program of the NIH with George Washington University and the Washington Veterans Administration Medical Center.  

In addition, he earned an MBA, with a focus on the business of medicine/science, from The Johns Hopkins University.  As a research investigator, Dr. Rodgers is widely recognized for his contributions to the development of the first effective—and FDA approved—therapy for sickle cell anemia.  He was a principal investigator in clinical trials to develop therapy for patients with sickle cell disease and also performed basic research that focused on understanding the molecular basis of how certain drugs induce gamma-globin gene expression.

More recently, he and his collaborators have reported on a modified blood stem-cell transplant regimen that is highly effective in reversing sickle cell disease in adults, and is associated with relatively low toxicity.

 

In 2020, 91% of RUSM students passed the initial step of the United States Medical Licensing Examination® (USMLE®) on the first attempt. And in 2021-2022, results show yet another strong year for RUSM with a 96% first-time residency attainment rate* thus far. Located on the island of Barbados and with a network of more than 15,000 alumni, RUSM is one of the largest providers of doctors for the U.S. healthcare system. RUSM graduates practice in all 50 states and in Puerto Rico.

*First time residency attainment rate is the percent of students attaining a 2022-23 residency position out of all graduates or expected graduates in 2021-22 who were active applicants in the 2022 NRMP match or who attained a residency position outside the NRMP match.