Find out more about her from the Q & A below.

 

ROSS: Why did you choose Ross University School of Medicine?

ARAFA: Ross was always a good choice for me because my cousin was currently attending when I was
looking into it and my sister and I had previously gone to two information seminars, so I was
pretty confident and educated about what I was applying for. I also applied to Ross because
my MCAT scores were not US med school competitive and I knew I'd have better chances
there.


ROSS: Where did you complete your undergraduate studies?

ARAFA: I majored in public health policy at University of California, Irvine


ROSS: Where did you grow up?

ARAFA: I grew up in Los Angeles, California


ROSS: What area of medicine are you most interested in? Why?

ARAFA: I love internal medicine because of the broad range of pathology and patient population that
you get exposed to. I specifically am interested in being a hospitalist because I love working
hands-on in the hospital in acute care settings. It fascinates me how complex the body is and
how it truly does take a lot to make us sick, so it's crucial to understand the reasoning behind
every patient’s illness and presentation.


ROSS: How would you describe your experiences in Dominica?

ARAFA: I had an amazing time while living in Dominica for 16 months. I experienced medical school
with my best friend who also happens to be my older sister. We were roommates again and
were shoulders for each other to laugh and cry on. We also developed so many life-long
friendships on the island and a renewed appreciation for our surroundings. The campus and
its facilities were constantly being renewed and amazing things kept happening for us. Even
though some of the most stressful moments in my life happened on that island, it was always
nice to take a moment and walk a few steps to watch the sun set over the beautiful Atlantic
Ocean.


ROSS: Were you involved in any student clubs or activities?

ARAFA: I was involved in several student clubs on campus including the ER club which offered many
workshops to gain skills and exposure to common procedures that are done in the ER. I was
also an active member of the Ross internal medicine and neuroscience club where I tutored
my peers in neuroanatomy and neuropathophysiology. As an Arab American Muslim, I was also
part of the Muslim Student Association (MSA) where we would fundraise and make trips to
the Carib territory to help diagnose and treat natives who otherwise have no other or very
limited access to healthcare.


ROSS: Where have you done your core and elective rotations?

ARAFA: I did all my core rotations and most of my electives at California Hospital Medical Center In
the heart of downtown Los Angeles. I did two electives at Norwalk and Danbury hospital in
Connecticut.

In 2020, 91% of RUSM students passed the initial step of the United States Medical Licensing Examination® (USMLE®) on the first attempt. And in 2021-2022, results show yet another strong year for RUSM with a 96% first-time residency attainment rate* thus far. Located on the island of Barbados and with a network of more than 15,000 alumni, RUSM is one of the largest providers of doctors for the U.S. healthcare system. RUSM graduates practice in all 50 states and in Puerto Rico.

*First time residency attainment rate is the percent of students attaining a 2022-23 residency position out of all graduates or expected graduates in 2021-22 who were active applicants in the 2022 NRMP match or who attained a residency position outside the NRMP match.